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Q

awkward-equestrian asked:

Hi! I was wondering what you're opinion on twitches are? (Not sure if I spelled it right) The people who work at barn where I take lessons use twitches on horses that they want to be calm like during vet visits or while the horse is being clipped. Do you support them, hate them...? I just thought I would ask someone who I know to be knowledgeable about horse stuff. :3

A

fivegaited:

I’ve literally never needed one on a horse I have trained, so my gut reaction to them is that a well-trained horse that has always been treated appropriately shouldn’t need such a device. That being said, many of us who work with horses often find ourselves handling other people’s badly trained and/or mistreated horses, often with no opportunity to retrain these animals. When you must handle a horse that has been taught to behave dangerously, to give it medical attention for example, your first objective must be to keep yourself safe. Period.
However, because I’ve never used twitches, I don’t fully understand how they work and I don’t know what kind of permanent damage could be done of they were used improperly, etc, so I can’t really comment further on that specific device. I will say that when I see people using things like stud chains on animals that they have owned for years and have had AMPLE time to retrain so that they wouldn’t need such strong aids, I lose some respect for that person’s horsemanship. If you work for a vet and have to handle all kinds of mishandled animals, that’s one thing, but if you can’t handle your own animals that’s another story entirely.
It’s funny to get this ask now, because I was talking earlier today with someone who owns an excellent stallion who has become popular as a stud here in the US. She was saying that she couldn’t believe it when they brought him to a facility to collect sperm for AI, and the people who worked their wouldn’t let him off the trailer without a chain under his lip. She said her horse had never seen a chain, didn’t need a chain (and its true, he travels all over for shows and breed demos and is ridden alongside mares with no issues) but that was their policy. It got me thinking about Iceland, and I realized that I never saw a stud chain the whole time I was there. I’m sure someone must use them, but there wasn’t a single stud chain at the large breeding farm where I worked, which has many stallions that were in handled before they turned 4 and then came in for training. We had at least 10 stallions in the stable, with mares stabled there too, walking down the aisles back and forth past each other all day and no one needed a chain. At all the breeding competitions and stallion shows and sport competitions we went to, I never saw a stud chain. Stallions don’t need chains, but Americans are so conditioned to think they do that a chain is required at an AI collection facility. I imagine its similar with things like twitches.. Did the horse that’s being twitched even get a chance to stand still and behave before he was twitched, or was he twitched preventatively? How can horses learn how to behave appropriately if we come at them directly with stud chains and twitches and never stop to show the horse what we want, and give the horse a chance to react appropriately? Training takes time, and I think a lot of people are looking for shortcuts.
Anyway, that was long winded. Basically I think you do what you have to do to keep yourself safe, but every effort should be made to train the horses you have access to so that they don’t need things like twitches to stop them from inadvertently hurting you.

Brb freaking out because Marijke De Jong follows me on Insta

Q

Anonymous asked:

i tried positive reinforcement/clicker training as a fun thing with my ottb and he went from the calmest best horses to bucking/rearing/refusing to come in from his paddock. I've had him vetted clean, saddle approved, etc, all the extensive measures, and that's the one thing that had changed. so please don't preach it for EVERY horse because it has only made my horse unhappy

A

heartofhorselords:

lmfao

I’m pretty sure your training sucks. Also sure you went too fast in the beginning and skipped too many steps. Clicker training is for every horse. Not every person understands what they’re doing, though. For that severe a reaction, I suspect that you fucked up, and possibly that in introducing clicker training you churned up older, deeper pathology. Just saying.

Lolz to equestrians who blame science and not themselves.

Straightness Training Mastery live event 2014 with Marijke De Jong

barefootdressage:

The circle is one of the harder exercises to ride well, and yet one of the first ones we learn and teach the horse. It is simple, but not easy. Because of this, many issues that you have as a rider or that the horse has with straightness will be brought to light on the circle.

image

"What are you…

Iceland Horse Tour Report

This is a full report about my experience at Ishestar horse tours right outside of Reykjavik.  Im making this especially for fivegaited since she will probably be able to confirm and discuss my experiences.

First off, id like to begin stating that I usually stay away from horse tour type tourism.  Many places that offer horse rider tours do not care much about the wellfare of the horses and the instruction the riders are given.  Im pretty sure we can all imagine those hard handed riders direct reining on those curb bits and not having a clue what they are doing to their horses…Kind like when I went on a trail ride at Yosemite… yuck.

I went on an advanced 3 hour tour through the lava fields and special roadside horse trails with some breaks along the way for the horses and riders.  Now heres the deal with “advanced” tours:  the guides are going to assume that you already know how to sit all paces of the horse with confidence.  They don’t how what or how you ride, and they don’t know what you’ve been taught.  All they can do is give you general tips to maximize horse and rider communication and overall comfort.  I thought this was important:

"not all of our horses can tolt or pace easily.  It is best to let them travel at the pace that they are most comfortable with at the speed we are riding"

I was going to ask the guides for an easy tolter, but unfortunately, some Swiss people asked before and took them -_-

THIS is the Ishestar riding video that we were shown.  Its a bit basic with all that “pull this way and that way to get your horse to do that” crap, but what else could I expect? :P 

My horse was more of a trotter but when we took them to a higher speed, he found it difficult to keep up with the horses at the trot and he would switch in and out of the canter. I just let him go at whatever pace he felt more comfortable with (even if it wasn’t that famous smooth gait).  He was also very light and responsive (unlike some other experiences I have had with tourist trail horses in the US).  I also liked how the horses were bright and alert to their surroundings and each other.  They played and scratched each other at our rest stops, and took direction easily without being robot-like.  

One thing which I thought was insane is some of the terrain we traveled on. At some points in the trail, we were going along huge stones! not just gravel or smooth stones, but big football sized lava rocks littering the narrow pathways!  I watched the horse in front of me tolt with ease through the rocks without loosing his footing.  I feel like this was a good place to injure a horses legs and feet if the horse was to trip, especial at a higher speed.  It just felt a little bit careless to me, however, I’m amazed at how surefooted these little guys are.

Another thing that bothered me is that many (if not most) of the horses had pretty bad growth rings in the hooves and many of them had flared toes.

A few little things such as not getting the thick mane out of the saddles way or the forelock out of the bridles way were minor things that I fixed once I was mounted, but thats just me, and I’m sure most tourists overlook this.

Overall, It was a cool tour, and although I feel a bit sorry for horses that are ridding by a different riders every day, Im happy to have shared a few relaxing hours with the horses and I was able to ride him as I would with my own horse.  Next time I visit Iceland, I will defiantly look deeper into getting a riding lesson with a reputable Icelandic instructor on a school horse who can teach me how to tolt!

unhappyhorses:

I’ve been thinking lately about the different kind of reactions I get to equine clicker training, and how I really have to tailor my responses to what I assume that person’s training background is. The world of equine training is extremely diverse, and I thought it would be interesting to sum up…

So… Ive been at a Marijke De Jong clinic right outside of Amsterdam in Aalsmeer… And its been really ironic that Marijke does beautiful straightness training at liberty, in hand and groundwork demos showing lightness and suppleness while all the other dressage folk in the background rollkured their horses and jerked on them to death. Everyone in the seats watching the clinic were cringing and sitting on the edge of their seats. I am surrounded by fellow competition dressage critics :)
And no… These photos are not just a moment in time. Everyone warming up and training their horse went through every movement in every gait behind the vertical or flat out rollkur headlock. So… Ive been at a Marijke De Jong clinic right outside of Amsterdam in Aalsmeer… And its been really ironic that Marijke does beautiful straightness training at liberty, in hand and groundwork demos showing lightness and suppleness while all the other dressage folk in the background rollkured their horses and jerked on them to death. Everyone in the seats watching the clinic were cringing and sitting on the edge of their seats. I am surrounded by fellow competition dressage critics :)
And no… These photos are not just a moment in time. Everyone warming up and training their horse went through every movement in every gait behind the vertical or flat out rollkur headlock. So… Ive been at a Marijke De Jong clinic right outside of Amsterdam in Aalsmeer… And its been really ironic that Marijke does beautiful straightness training at liberty, in hand and groundwork demos showing lightness and suppleness while all the other dressage folk in the background rollkured their horses and jerked on them to death. Everyone in the seats watching the clinic were cringing and sitting on the edge of their seats. I am surrounded by fellow competition dressage critics :)
And no… These photos are not just a moment in time. Everyone warming up and training their horse went through every movement in every gait behind the vertical or flat out rollkur headlock.

So… Ive been at a Marijke De Jong clinic right outside of Amsterdam in Aalsmeer… And its been really ironic that Marijke does beautiful straightness training at liberty, in hand and groundwork demos showing lightness and suppleness while all the other dressage folk in the background rollkured their horses and jerked on them to death. Everyone in the seats watching the clinic were cringing and sitting on the edge of their seats. I am surrounded by fellow competition dressage critics :)

And no… These photos are not just a moment in time. Everyone warming up and training their horse went through every movement in every gait behind the vertical or flat out rollkur headlock.

hunterjumpersismylife:

theeventingnerd:

winterstormathena:

How to not lose your reins when you’re a lazy fuck and don’t feel like holding them.

This is actually genius

WHY HAVENT I THOUGHT OF THIS BEFORE

^^^

(via heartofhorselords)

kimblewick:

Something a little different in the showjumping arena! 

CSI5* CSI2* CSIYH1* CSIAm-A

What a speedy opening round! Today Juergen Krackow (AUT/S) raced with his grey stallion Boulharouz as third but last starter through the CSI2* 1.40 m course and, with a time of 64.11 seconds, easily beat the time of Australian rider Jamie Winning who had led till then. The Salzburg-based rider impressed not only with his time but also the exact turns and correctly estimated distances, as well as the bitless bridle called a Bosal, which he had chosen for his stallion. “I would like to show that even in the big sports, horses can be presented successfully with alternative bridles instead of snaffle bits” explained Juergen Krackow in the winner’s interview, having already achieved third place yesterday. ’

[x]

(via scienceofcatastrophe)

barefoothooves:

Who wants to hear something pathetic?

As a barefoot trimmer that uses mainly what is called the Hoofprint Trim, I am an active member of their Facebook page. It is a very helpful page for a lot of owners/owner trimmers/hoof care professionals and generally is very low drama. There used to be a…

I saw that page… And laughed for a long time